IKARIOTIKOS- GREECE

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IKARIOTIKOS DANCE, GREECE

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Also commonly referred to as “Kariotikos” is a Southeast European dance form known as Ikariotikos. This “traditional” dance is said to have originated from an island called Ikaria located in Greece. Furthermore, this dance is accompanied by a famous song titled “My love of Ikaria” written and composed by Giorgos Konitopoulas. In addition, this dance is mainly performed during festive occasions such as marriages and religious festivals.

A. History/origin of the Ikariotikos:

Traditionally, the island of Ikarian in Greece is known to celebrate festive occasions such as marriages and religious festivals using a combination of music and dance. It was therefore due to the presence of a vibrant “singing and dancing” culture on the island that this dance was created by the locals.

B. Costumes used in the Ikariotikos:

The costumes worn by the performers vary according to the gender as follows:

1. For males:

The attire worn will include a white full sleeved shirt, a black trouser, a black overcoat, a black cap, a pair of black socks, and a pair of black shoes.

2. For females:

The attire worn will include a colourful long dress that will include a skirt, an apron, a headgear, a pair of white socks, and a pair of black shoes.

C. Music involved in the Ikariotikos:

The musical instruments mainly involved in this dance style include a mixture of stringed instruments i.e. chordophones, wind instruments i.e. aerophones and drum instruments i.e. membranophones.

D. Training availability and the technique involved in Ikariotikos:

In terms of technique, the performers in this dance initially arrange themselves in a semicircle holding each other at the shoulder. Furthermore, this dance then comprises of three parts and they are as follows:

  1. Part 1: Basically involves the performer using slow steps that closely resembles walking.
  2. Part 2: Basically the performer at this juncture uses steps that are used in a dance form called Issios.
  3. Part 3: Basically the performer at this stage (with the rhythm of the music increasing) makes use of quick steps that involves fluidity in both leg and body movement.

As for training schools/centers, there are none available around the world since this “traditional” dance is mainly performed in Greece.

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